Menu

School of Economics and Finance

People menu
Barbara Petrongolo

Barbara Petrongolo
Professor, Head of School

Location: W412
email: b.petrongolo@qmul.ac.uk
Phone: +44 20 7882 8421
Website: http://personal.lse.ac.uk/petrongo/

Office hours: Monday 11:30-12:30

Research keywords: 

Labour Economics and Public Economics

Barbara Petrongolo is a Professor of Economics at Queen Mary University of London and currently Head of the School of Economics and Finance. She is also a research associate at the Centre for Economic Performance (LSE), and a research fellow of CEPR and IZA.

Barbara’s main area of interest is applied labour economics. The focus of some of her recent contributions is the impact of job search frictions on labor market performance, with applications to unemployment dynamics, welfare policy and interdependencies across local labour markets. She has also carried out research on the causes and characteristics of gender inequalities in wages and employment rates, both in a historical perspective and across countries, with emphasis on the role of employment selection mechanisms, structural transformation, and interactions within the household.

After completing her PhD at the London School of Economics, Barbara was an assistant professor in the Economics Department at the University of Carlos III (Madrid), before returning to the LSE in 2001 as a lecturer in economics.

Publications:

“Worktime regulations and family labor supply" (joint with Dominique Goux and Eric Maurin). American Economic Review 104: 252-276, 2014.
"Job and wage mobility with minimum wages and imperfect compliance" (joint with Zvi Eckstein and Suqin Ge). Journal of Applied Econometrics 26: 580-612, 2011.
"The long-term effects of job search requirements: Evidence from the UK JSA reform". Journal of Public Economics 93: 1234-1253, 2009.
"Unequal pay or unequal employment? A cross-country analysis of gender gaps" (joint with Claudia Olivetti). Journal of Labor Economics 26: 621-654, 2008.
"A test between stock-flow matching and the random matching function approach" (joint with Melvyn Coles). International Economic Review 49: 1113-1141, 2008.

Bookmark and Share
Return to top